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SALIF KEITA

Salif Keita, born in 1949 in Djoliba, is sometimes called the Golden Voice of Africa. He is a direct descendent of Sundiata Keita, the Mandinka warrior king who founded the Malian empire in the 13th century.

Salif Keita makes his Florida debut with this exciting concert. One of today’s major Afropop stars, he is a direct descendent of Sundiata Keita, the Mandinka warrior king who founded the Malian empire in the 13th century. Born an albino – a sign of bad luck – Salif Keita was shunned and ostracized by his family and community alike.  In 1967 he moved to Bamako where he began playing in nightclubs with one of his brothers. Two years later he joined the 16-member Rail Band, before moving on to found the legendary Les Ambassadeurs. Now based in Paris, Salif Keita is a revered figure to all those who love African music,


Video shared by Anton Arteagatar….YA HACE TIEMPO QUE NO TENGO ABUELA Y NADIE ME ALIMENTA EL EGO.

 

Marifa dâ tè na, oh te bunssan là, bunssa te kô, mâ forçé, oohh nikanu le lô

I never like music to repeat itself but this time I really wanted to take the plunge,” says Salif, who since his rise to fame with the Griots in 1969, has often strayed from the conventional route. In his career, he has explored Afro Pop, Salsa-with-a-Twist, rhythmical funk and even Afro-Jazz-Rock in his more recent collaborations with Joe Zawinul and Carlos Santana.

Je suis un noir
Ma peau est blanche
Et moi j’aime bien a
C’est La Difference qui est jolie

Je suis un blanc
Mon sang est noir
Et moi j’adore a
C’est La Difference qui est jolie

Je voudrais
Que nous nous entendions dans l’amour
Que nous nous comprenions dans l’amour et dans la paix

La vie sera belle 
Chacun a son tour aura son amour

La vie sera belle
Chacun dans l’honneur
Aura son bonheur
La vie sera belle

D finai bai
D djl
D kagni
D magni
O bai y couleur kaon ka gnyoro dafa

D finai bai
D djl
D kagni
D magni
O bai y couleur kaon ka gnyoro dafa

Between the lines, Salif speaks with the voice of a sovereign. Although he may be singing odes of love, beneath the veneer, Salif points out the excesses of the powerful and the wealthy, putting them firmly, yet gracefully in their place.
Salif clearly prefers the laughter of children, and the wild fun they have on the streets of Bamako. These children introduce the song “Natty”, named after his youngest daughter. In it, like a grown-up, as tall as her tender years, she says to him: “Je t’aime“/”m’bifé” His answer, which is full of love and with a note of humour, is symbolic of the record and puts Papa Keita back where he belongs!

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